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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the republican candidate was poppy bush. george h.w. bush. the day before the election that year he went and campaigned in pennsylvania. and then the next day, he lost pennsylvania. the next election, 1996, republican candidate was bob dole. right before the election, bob dole went and campaigned in pennsylvania. then bob dole lost pennsylvania. in 2004 the republican was president george w. bush and the day before the election, george w. bush went and campaigned in pennsylvania. and then the next day, george w. bush lost pennsylvania. last time around as well the sunday before the election, there's republican john mccain, campaigning in pennsylvania. and then john mccain loses pennsylvania. right before the election, you can set your watch by it. the republican presidential contender will go and campaign in pennsylvania. and every year the media responds by saying, wow the republican is going to pennsylvania. maybe the republicans are going to win pennsylvania this year. does this mean the republicans are planning on winning pennsylvania this year? and the republicans say, yes, we're go
enlist to sell this message of what real change he's offering america? the headliners were george w. bush's secretary of state, george w. bush's labor secretary, the governor and current speaker of the house. mitt romney, change you can believe in if you really liked george w. bush and if you like the current republican congress. then we're the kind of real change we're looking for. who cast this thing, the democrats? one of the reasons that the message of real change resonated back in 2008 because the country at large had ceased to be delighted by the george w. bush administration. and it wasn't just the war in iraq or, or, or, or. it was stuff like this. this is the u.s. state department's annual report on global terrorism in 2003. every year they would put together a report like this detailing accidents of terrorism around the world. and the next report after this one, showed that despite the bush administration's claims that we were winning the war on terror, despite the constant claims, the number of terrorist attacks had gone up to its highest level in the two decades the state depa
of president george w. bush's service in the alabama national guard popped up in the last couple days or weeks of the election, in 2000 there were reports of a dui arrest that he had in connecticut a couple decades before. in both cases, they didn't move many boats. the october surprise can completely alter a presidential contest, but italy has not done that that much. host: you noted the examples of george w. bush. we know as it is that an october surprise release ways voters. guest: last-minute things can sway voters. i cited examples in that article. not necessarily in the presidential race but let us look the other races right now. in india, the senate candidate murdoch looked like he was slightly above joe donnelly going into the final debate between the men last monday. in that debate he made some comments about rates that were taken -- vitter able to be used in a democratic campaign ad. those comments have dominated the states. the political space for the last couple days. and it has sunk mourdocks place. what we saw there was a real moment in which a last second declaration by a candid
. >> stephen: now we have a surplus when bill clinton left office. >> uh-huh. >> stephen: and were george w. bush's director of management and budget. who came in and chloroformed you and stole all the money? (cheers and applause) >> well, the answer is the dotcom bubble broke and the money people thought was coming did not show up. wouldn't have mattered if you were president, stephen, which maybe you will be one day. >> stephen: i thought about it. >> i know. >> stephen: now you have got this book here. people, governors who release books are often testing the waters for the presidency. are you thinking about jumping in? there are 12 days left. that's longer than the entire tim pawlenty campaign. >> i wrote the book in lew, actually, of running for president myself. i was just trying to contribute a few thoughts without-- without taking that on. >> stephen: you know what this book reminded me of? >> i'm afraid to ask, but what. (laughter) >> stephen: reminds me of my book, america again. saving america, america again. rebecome the greatness we never weren't. you know what, on amazon peopl
of president george w. bush bush's service in the alabama national guard popped up in the last couple days, last couple of weeks of the election. in 2000, there were reports of a dui arrest that bush had in connecticut a couple decades before the. in both of those cases, they didn't really move many votes. southern ocean of the october surprise is something that can completely alter a presidential contest really hasn't done that that much. >> host: right. we both noted example that george w. bush. he won. do we have evidence that an october surprise really swayed -- sways voters to? >> guest: eyesight a couple of examples in that article. it's not necessarily the presidential level but let's take a look at some of the races farther down about happening around the country right now. in indiana, the senate candidate richard mourdock looked like he was slightly ahead of democrats joe donnelly going into the final debate between the two men. in that debate, mourdock made some comments about rape that were taken, well, that were able to be used in a democratic campaign ad. those comments have d
, tipped the election to george w. bush. maybe it was just one vote on the supreme court. you get my point. it's why this year small numbers can have a big impact on the election. as first lady michelle obama reminded an audience in wisconsin late last week. >> it could all come down to just a few battleground states, like right here in wisconsin, states that could be decided by just a few thousand votes. when you take that number and you spread those votes out across this entire state, you know, across hundreds of cities and thousands of wards, it becomes smaller, right? so when you break it down, it turns out that just a handful of votes in every ward could make all the difference in this election. >> so here when we hear about disenfranchisement of any voters, we pay attention. when we first heard last week that arizona had distributed voter registration cards with a spanish translation saying election day was november 8th instead of november 6th, we were initially willing to give them the benefit of the doubt. after all, there were fewer than 50 cards printed. we could buy the county's
this state twice. in 2,000 it went to george w. bush. but in two thour four it went to john carry. the president got a nine point victory in 2008. so we are a toss up state. the polls go back and forth forth. >>> it's difficult to determine who is going to win this state. host: how do residents vote on election day? guest: there is not early voting but tr is absentee ballots which have you to sign a form saying you're not going to be available on voting day to come to the polls. traditionally polls are open from 7:00 to 7:00, some are open until 8:00 p.m. on election day. we have one of the highest voter turnouts in the country. other stratist cal facts are that we are one of the least tax states in the nation, the least stack state actually. we have no income tax, no sales tax. both the democrat and republican candidates will campaign on that issue pledging that they will not have an income tax or sales tax. our two governor candidates are running on that issue as a matter of fact. host: and talk about the recount laws that are in the state of new hampshire. is it possible that t
and whether it is a return to the policies of george w. bush. >>guest: chris, it is simple why governor romney is doing so were better in ohio. people are focused on the economy and jobs and mitt romney has a land that is pro growth and pro jobs and president obama doesn't. when you look at the last four years they are disappointed. we are living through the weakest economic recovery since the great depression, there are 22 million americans struggling to find works and 3.5 million more women in poverty. take home pay has gone down $4,300 per family. president obama has the glossy brochure and i have looked at that brochure and i layed this role of obama during the debate preparation and it is more of the same. you can argue we need to do more of the same but it hasn't worked and it hasn't worked by president obama's own measurement, saying unemployment would be 15 percent lower if we passed the stimulus package. he said economic growth today would be two-thirds higher than it is. so, it hasn't worked. the one thing he does have in his new proposal is to raise taxes. yes, he wants to raise tax
1992 phenomenon that has changed that. he one the state twice. in 2000 it went to george w. bush. kerrey., john care the president got a nine point victory in 2008. we really are tossups state. the polls go back and forth. it is difficult to determine who is going to win this state right now. host: is there early voting and how do the hampshire residents vote on election day? guest: there's not early voting, but there's absentee ballot. you have to sign a form saying you are not going to be available on voting day to come to the polls. traditionally, the polls are open from about 7:00 until 7:00. some locations are open until 8:00 p.m. on election day. we have one of the highest voter turnouts in the country. other statistical interesting facts are that we are one of the least taxed states in the nation. the least. we have no income tax, no sales tax. the democratic and republican candidates will pledge on that issue, saying they will not have an income tax or sales tax. our two gubernatorial candidates right now are both running on that issue. host: neil levesque, about the reco
george w. bush and a romney supporter and rnc surrogate. good afternoon to you, sir. >> great to be with you, craig. >> polls in florida show the race mighty close. how tough will it be for romney to carry the state if democrats win the early voting battle by a significant margin? >> governor romney really needs to win in the state of florida. the early voting, you characterized that right. it's been a democratic strength. as a matter of fact, in 2008, the obama team had a 10% advantage on early vote nationwide. what we are seeing in these battleground states and across the country in this cycle is that that advantage is still there but much smaller, less than 4% advantage to the democrats so far in early voting. what the republicans are trying to do in key states like florida, especially ohio, is just do everything they can to improve upon their performance four years ago and mccain's performance four years ago. to have a really vigorous get out the vote effort on election day. >> i want to continue this conversation about early voting. let's move to ohio now. "time" magazine
was for the auto rescue. no, they weren't. most republicans, with the exception by the way of president george w. bush who let it happen with actions he took, were against the auto rescue. so i don't understand, well i do understand, but people just don't want to take responsibility for where they stood on that issue. >> this was a question, carly about the auto bailout b. what role government direct government money would play in restructuring these companies. >> that's right. and who stands first in line to be repaid? is it the unions? or is it debtors and creditors? that was the fundamental question. and the truth is, it is disingenuous and factually inaccurate to say that republicans weren't for the rescue of the auto industry. the question was how. and what. and who would be repaid. but let me go back to your original question. of course it's about the economy. and in ohio, both governor kasich and mitt romney are right. governor kasich is right that his policies fundamentally different than obama's, lower taxes, close the budget deficit. make, create a regulatory environment that encourage
to the policies of george w. bush. >> chris, it is pretty simple why governor romney s doing so much better in ohio. people are focused on the economy and jobs and mitt romney has got a plan that is progrowth, projobs to turn this thing around and president obama doesn't. when people look at the last four years they are disappointed. they must be. we are living through the weakest economic recovery since the great depression. there are 22 million americans struggling to find work. 3.5 million more women in poverty. take home pay has gone down 4300 bucks per family on average. we are headed in the wrong direction. president obama, your' right he has a glossy new you brochure. i looked at that brochure and i played this role of obama during debate prep and it is more of the same. you can argue that we need to do more of the same but it hasn't worked and it hasn't worked by president obama's own when he surements. he said unemployment would be 50% lower today than it is if we just passed the stimulus package. he said economic growth would be two thirds higher than it actually is. it hants work
, you go back to george w. bush and it wasn't policies he put forward. it was the congress. the congress has put forward a number of policies. in fact, the house of representatives has passed no taxpayer funding of abortion measure. it's died in the senate. i think if we see a change in the senate we have folks like todd akin and richard murdock elected it will pass the senate and go to mitt romney and i fully expect that he would sign a measure that would lannd on his desked. in many ways the president is more of the cheerleader for the country and helps facilitate these measures that come up through the people's representatives in congress in particular the house of representatives. and i think that's the way it should be. so i'm not necessarily looking for mitt romney as president to go into advance a set of policies. we have these policies coming up. they're being blocked in the senate by senator reid. but now if we see a change in the senate they will get to the white house and the president and i fully expect that mitt romney as president will support a number of measures including
services secretary for george w. bush. he ran a weak campaign. republicans had a lot of success in wisconsin but it's a new generation. i'm watching really closely to see whether or not this means wisconsin is becoming a serious swing state not just in this year's presidential and senate but ring. congressman rick berg was elected in 2010 but elected after democrats spent $2.5 million in north dakota very small state to define him. his unfavorable ratings very high and the woman he's running against the former attorney general is very popular throughout the state. >> the poll numbers show her behind. >> they do. one recent poll shows her down ten points 50-40. i i'm not sure i believe that. they think this race is closer although rick berg is ahead. a rare democrat in a republican state ahead. >> senator in jon tester running for re-election. most polls show a very tight race with the congressman. this is a race that's been essentially tied since he got in the race. montana only has one congressional seat. same number of people vote for him as tester in 200
enough risk in their lives. barack obama was more orderly than john mccain. george w. bush was more orderly than john kerry. and so if i'm a candidate this year, i'm trying to reassure people i'm the guy who can help you out when forces much bigger than you come in and give you a big wallop. >> you said a minute ago, you're not quite sure where mitt romney's soul is, and i think a lot of people, republicans included would agree with you about that. is he socially conservative? is he the massachusetts moderate? is he a small-government conservative? does that trouble you about what kind of president he would be? in other words, if we don't know who he is now, should we worry about who he would be if he got into office? >> yeah. it does trouble me. it disturbs me about how many different shapes he's taken. from a sheer management perspective. if you work in the reagan administration, if you started meeting at the deputy's level, you know what the president wants already, so you figure out how to enact what he basically wants. if you work for a president who doesn't know what he wants,
phenomenon that has changed that. he one the state twice. in 2000 it went to george w. bush. kerrey., john care the president got a nine point victory in 2008. we really are tossups state. the polls go back and forth. it is difficult to determine who is going to win this state right now. host: is there early voting and how do the hampshire residents vote on election day? guest: there's not early voting, but there's absentee ballot. you have to sign a form saying you are not going to be available on voting day to come to the polls. traditionally, the polls are open from about 7:00 until 7:00. some locations are open until 8:00 p.m. on election day. we have one of the highest voter turnouts in the country. other statistical interesting facts are that we are one of the least taxed states in the nation. the least. we have no income tax, no sales tax. the democratic and republican candidates will pledge on that issue, saying they will not have an income tax or sales tax. our two gubernatorial candidates right now are both running on that issue. host: neil levesque, about the recount laws in the
organized campaigns that we've seen in recent memory was the 2004 george w. bush campaign. karl rove engineered a very impressive microtargeting effort, where they started to integrate people's consumer preferences, with their voting data, to try to more precise, so instead of just saying ok, we're going to target everyone that we know is, say, you know, a latino woman, you can actually individually start to target people based on what kind of car they drive or what kind of cereal they eat, all kind factors from when you fill out surveys or that kind of thing. the obama campaign did that even more impressive in 2008 and they've been building on that ever since, so they've built a formidable, digital integrated data targeting effort that they have put together with this vast network of field offices on the ground, and neighborhood teams and volunteers and through facebook and everything else. so they know practically who all of their voters are. the millions and millions of people that they expect or hope they can drive out to the polls to vote for obama. >> molly ball is a staff writ
political journalism to the latest, you know, whatever happened recently. george w. bush's fairly narrow victory in 2004 if you look at it, particularly for an incumbent, was a sign that the left was dead forever. permanent republican majority and then 2006 and 2008 was, oh, man, the republicans are going to be a permanent minority party. 2010 we write these pieces. the long-term demographic trends are not great for the represent tan party. >> people of color. we talked about this. the republican party's greatest challenge, i've been saying this for 20 years, you can't just continue on with white voters. if mitt romney wins the election he'll win with white voters. we've seen that polling data. the challenges as a governing president, do you want to just win elections with just white voters? women don't really like you, african-americans, latinos. that's the -- >> the gender gap is nowhere near where the racial gap is. >> it's huge for the race. >> we are now headed -- there's a headline yesterday for editors, the most racially polarized election since 1988. that was the famous election
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)